Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original Review

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Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

Diver watches are everywhere these days. Almost every watch brand makes it. There are probably more diver’s watches on the market than others. But there are diver watches and diver-style watches, and then there are ultimate diver watches and extreme diver watches. That’s where Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original comes in. There’s a lot going on with this watch, and a lot of it isn’t just what meets the eye. Sapphire bezel, prominent crown guard and sandwich dial. Something we have seen in some form before. But this isn’t just your average sandwich dial. When have you ever seen a sandwich bezel? Oh, and what’s underneath? flat tritium tube. The crown protector is patented and a lot of engineering has gone into it internally as well, providing extra protection for the case and movement from shocks and shocks. All of this doesn’t come cheap, as the MSRP is $3,349.

specification

  • 40mm (stated size)
  • 42.5mm bezel
  • Lug distance 51mm
  • Thickness 14.5mm
  • Lug width 20mm
  • 212 grams
  • sapphire crystal
  • sapphire bezel insert
  • Sandwich dial using tritium tube
  • BALL RR1102-CSL movement (base ETA 2836)
  • COSC certified
  • Patented crown guard
  • 20mm to 18mm tapered stainless steel bracelet
  • 200M waterproof

Price $3,349

https://shop.ballwatch.ch/en/ball-watches/EH/Original-DM2118B-SCJ-BK

The Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original is packed with technology, with shock resistance built into the movement, case and crown protector. SpringLock hairspring anti-shock, SprigSeal anti-shock system, magnetic resistance up to 80,000A/m, Mu metal shielding and more. This ETA 2836 movement is highly refined and the case, crown and movement are shock resistant. The watch is built to handle strong impacts, drop bounces, and shocks during wear without causing a beat or, in extreme cases, damage to the movement. However, all of these specifications can be read on Ball’s website. So what happens when you wear this?

Movement protection, shock resistance, anti-magnetic properties, these are all great features to have, but they’re things you don’t notice and you never see, even though your watch is always running. So what about what you’re seeing? Let’s take a look at its unique crown protector. As many learned in the early days of diving watches, protecting the crown is just as important as water resistance. The original dive watches did not have crown guards, but as time has gone on, watch brands have continued to innovate and develop new methods of crown protection. Ball didn’t want to be left behind, so he developed his own system. It’s actually quite simple, press a button on the lever and the arm swings down, allowing you to access the crown to set the time, day/date, and wind the crown if you wish. Reversing the process locks everything up. Or is it?
As I was playing around with the watch, wearing it, taking photos, and recording videos, I realized that pressing that button opens a lever. I know what you’re thinking, isn’t that the point, Don? This means that if you accidentally drop it and the crown falls down, it can open up. It can open if it hits a door, wall, rock, etc. Now, the crown is still screwed down so there’s no problem with water ingress, but for as much Newtonian force as this crown protector can take, its Achilles heel is the push button to open it. Many people who buy this watch probably won’t get it wet or even go on a grueling adventure, but it makes me wonder what would happen to the hinge if the lever accidentally opens and you don’t notice it right away.

Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

That said, it’s a fun mechanism, easy to use, and adds some flair to the watch, even if it’s a little gimmicky. Is there something wrong with the gimmick? All-over luminous bezels, luminous crowns and clasps, and many other things are really gimmicky, but they’re cool and stand out, so why not have something different?
Moving on to the bezel and dial. Yes, there’s a flat tritium tube wedged beneath the dial and bezel insert. Yes, it’s a tritium tube. It may not look like it, but there’s tritium underneath, and that’s what makes Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original so great. The dial itself isn’t all that fancy, and is pretty subdued with a black sunray dial, a few lines of text, day and date, and of course the RR counterweight on the seconds hand.

The star of the show, however, is that they figured out a way to tuck tritium under the dial to make it look more like Super-LumiNova than the tritium tubes we usually see. And they take it a step further and do this on the bezel. This creates a pretty thick bezel, which may be a lot of gimmick, but it’s pretty cool that they were able to design and manufacture this and it works so well. Unlike painted luminous, tritium tubes do not require an external light source to emit light, making this clock very easy to read in the dark.

Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

However, the Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Orignal’s bezel action is a little on the sloppy side. Due to the thickness of the bezel area and the coin-edge design, the grip is fine, but not as tight as I expected. I’m not sure if the bezel assembly and tritium tube had anything to do with this, but I expected it to be a little more solid. The crown itself is perfect in my opinion, smooth, precise, and has a great feel, but I find the lever on the crown guard a bit in the way.

There are two other things that stand out to me about this Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original. For one thing, even though it’s such a highly protected watch, it’s only rated to 200m. Now I know I’ll never actually see that 200 meters of depth myself, and Ball has watches that can withstand deeper depths and pressures, but it makes me think. Met. Perhaps this is to keep the thickness down, as the watch is already approaching 15 mm thick, and if it were to be more water resistant, it would be quite thick on the wrist.
Another thing is that this watch has a high level of polish. I ranted a little bit about this in my written review, but while Ball watches aren’t the only ones that are this highly polished, for a watch that’s meant to be used and abused, this one’s The highly polished parts are very good. It’s a little puzzling, at least to me.

Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

The high polish extends to the edges and center links of the bracelet, but I have to give props to the entire bracelet. Firstly, I’ve always loved this design and even with the large depoliant buckle system, the bracelet isn’t too heavy or chunky and still balances well with the watch head. And that buckle or clasp system, what do you want to call it? Although not traditional, it has two adjustment holes rather than the standard deployant buckle, and has extensions on each side to allow it to be worn over a wetsuit or larger cuff. Half-links built into the bracelet (two on each side) allow for an even better fit, so you can wear this Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original no matter what you’re doing. It’s also a fairly large bracelet, easily fitting wrists between 8 and 8 1/4 inches (20.32cm to 20.96cm).

Before I explain how this watch fits my wrist, we need to discuss the size. Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Orignal comes in two sizes, 40mm and 43mm, but the listed sizes are very deceptive. If you measure the specific area, not including the crown or bezel, it’s 40mm. However, the bezel was 42.5mm, and the distance from west to east including the crown guard was a whopping 47mm. Now, keep in mind that this watch doesn’t look or feel like a 47mm at all, but it doesn’t look like a 40mm either. So if you look at this product and think that the same size will go well with a 40mm subwoofer, you are wrong.

So how does it fit on a 7 1/2 inch (19.05cm) wrist? Actually, I have to say it’s pretty good. Despite being larger than stated, it fits comfortably on my wrist despite how high the watch is on the wrist and the crown guard is extended. The 20mm bracelet tapers to 18mm, and the bezel extends above the case, but on the wrist it’s a 40mm case. So this watch is weird in the sense that even though it looks big, it’s smaller than you’d expect to wear it. It’s almost a riddle, but that’s the truth. If you like really big watches, choose 43mm. However, note that it will be a 45mm watch. The 40mm only comes in black, so its big brother comes in even more colors. (Correction, his 40mm with red bezel/black dial is also available)

Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

One thing I always say about the world of watches is that you’re not without options. These days, there are more choices and brands than ever before. I love that brands like Ball continue to push the boundaries of innovation. With this Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Orignal, they are committed to innovation and design. In my opinion, this model is the most sedate model in the Engineer Hydrocarbon lineup, but it’s also the only model with a tritium sandwich on the dial and bezel, and in the case of this his 40mm, at least of all the models. This is probably the easiest model to wear. Accommodates various wrist sizes.
After all, this is an over-engineered, highly functional, touch watch with a customized movement, COSC rating, unique look, and lots of advanced polishes. Like many of Ball’s watches, this watch is a little quirky and I like the coolness of this watch, even though I’m leaning more toward a more traditional, and as a friend recently said, “plain” design. cannot be ignored.
If you’re interested in this or the Engineer Hydrocarbon lineup, you’ll find it all. here.

Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original




Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original


Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original
Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original



Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original
Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original

The Ball Engineer Hydrocarbon Original Review article first appeared on WatchReport.com.

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